Abstract # 13459 Event # 54:

Scheduled for Thursday, August 22, 2019 01:30 PM-01:45 PM: (Room 326) Oral Presentation


SPECIES TYPICAL BEHAVIORS IN CAPTIVE CHIMPANZEES (PAN TROGLODYTES) LIVING IN UNITED STATES ZOOS, PRIMATE RESEARCH FACILITIES, AND SANCTUARIES

A. W. Clay1, M. Bloomsmith1, S. R. Ross2, S. Lambeth3, C. K. Lutz4, S. Breaux5, R. Pietsch6, A. Fultz7, M. Lammey8, S. L. Jacobson2 and J. Perlman1
1YNPRC Field Station, 2409 Taylor Lane, Lawrenceville, GA 30043, USA, 2Lester E. Fisher Center for the Study and Conservation of Apes, Lincoln Park Zoo, Chicago, IL, 3National Center for Chimpanzee Care, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Bastrop, TX, 4Southwest National Primate Research Center, San Antonio, TX, 5New Iberia Research Center, New Iberia, LA, 6Center for Great Apes, Wauchula, FL, 7Chimp Haven, Keithville, LA, 8Alamogordo Primate Facility, Alamogordo, NM
line
     A survey of research facilities, sanctuaries, and zoos collected information regarding 1122 chimpanzees. Predictors (sex, groupsize, rearing history, and age) related to species-typical behaviors (STBs) were entered into logistic regression forward-Wald procedures. The most complex model which was 1) significant at that step, 2) significant as a model and 3) passed the HL test was selected. Tool-use retained age (Wald=36.39,df=2,p<.001) and rearing (Wald=7.16,df=2,p<.05). Immature animals were less likely than adults to exhibit tool-use (O.R.=.129,p<.001), as were elderly animals (O.R.=.236,p<.05). Animals not reared by their biological mothers (NOTMR) were less likely than mother-reared (MR) to engage in tool-use (O.R.=.517,p=.05). All predictors were retained by the model for nest-building (Sex:Wald=26.40,df=1,p<.001; Age:Wald=60.81,df=2,p<.001; Rearing:Wald=68.91,df=2,p<.001; Groupsize:Wald=34.15,df=2,p<.001). Males were less likely to build nests (O.R.=.438,p<.001), immature animals less likely than adults (O.R.=.150,p<.001), NOTMR less likely than MR (O.R.=.259,p<.001), and animals in small groups less likely than those in bigger groups (O.R.=.380,p<.001). The model for grooming retained sex (Wald=19.70,df=1,p<.001) and rearing (Wald=45.05,df=2,p<.001). Males were less likely to initiate grooming (O.R.=.392,p<.001) and NOTMR were less likely than MR (O.R.=.157,p<.001). The model for copulation retained sex (Wald:12.11,df=2,p<.005), age (Wald:15.47,df=2,p<.001) and rearing (Wald:64.64,df=2,p<.001). Males were less likely (O.R.=.559,p<.005), immatures less likely than adults (O.R.=.305,p<.001), and NOTMR less likely than MR (O.R.=.213,p<.001). The most consistent impact was related to rearing history: NOTMR were less likely than MR to exhibit any of the assessed STBs.