Abstract # 13461 Event # 202:

Scheduled for Saturday, August 24, 2019 02:15 PM-02:30 PM: (Room 313) Symposium


PHYLOGENY VS ENVIRONMENT: HOW HABITAT AND PHYLOGENETIC RELATIONSHIPS SHAPE THE GUT MICROBIOME OF NON-HUMAN PRIMATES.

B. Featherstone1, D. Venditti1, M. Mitchell2, G. Al-Ghalith3, J. B. Clayton3 and M. K. Gondor1
1Drexel University, Dept of Biology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA, 2University of Pennsylvania, 3University of Minnesota
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     The mammalian gut is home to a diverse community of microorganisms that affect key bodily functions and influences the health of the host. Research suggests that gut microbiome community (GMC) variation is common between and within species of wild animals, but few studies have been conducted examining the ecological and evolutionary processes that have shaped variation in host-associated microbial communities. Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea is considered by many to be a hotspot for primate species where seven different primate species are found. This system provides a unique opportunity to look at the GMC and disentangle the driving factors associated with the diversity of the GMC. We collected 200 fecal samples from Bioko Drill (Mandrillus leucophaeus poensis), Bioko Black Colobus (Colobus satanas satanas), Pennant’s Red Colobus (Piliocolobus pennantii), Red-tailed Guenon (Cercopithecus erythrotis erythrotis), Yellow Crowned Guenon (Cercopithecus pogonias pogonias), found across varying habitats and disturbance levels. The study summarized bacterial abundances with species richness and diversity measures to visualize GMC similarities. Our data demonstrates inter- and intra-specific variation of species richness and diversity of the GMC in non-human primates on Bioko Island. In addition, our results suggest the effect of phylogenetic relatedness on GMC is stronger than the effect of habitat type or disturbance level. However, habitat type and disturbance level show a weak signal in changing the GMC of host species.