Abstract # 13467 Event # 134:

Scheduled for Friday, August 23, 2019 03:45 PM-04:00 PM: (Room 325) Oral Presentation


IS BEHAVIOR IN ALL-MALE GROUPS CORRELATED WITH SUCCESS DURING LATER INTRODUCTIONS TO FEMALE GROUPS?

C. Long1, C. Remillard1, B. Beisner2, S. Moss2, R. C. Stavisky1, T. Meeker1, B. McGowan2 and M. A. Bloomsmith1
1Emory University, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Atlanta, GA, USA, 2California National Primate Research Center, University of California, Davis
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     Maintaining stable groups of rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) breeding males that can be introduced into new female breeding groups every few years can be challenging, primarily due to both intra-male and male-female aggression following exposure to novel females. Here, we report on the relationship between male behavior prior to introduction and introduction success. Baseline social behavior and socially-inflicted trauma data were collected from six multi-male groups (N=19) (50 hours observation/group) prior to their introduction to females (N=111). A scan sampling method was used for affiliation behaviors (e.g., social grooming) and event sampling for conflict and dominance signaling behaviors (e.g., silent bared teeth expression). Three of the introductions were successful (<10 females/male living in the group at six weeks post-introduction) and three were unsuccessful. A point biserial correlation indicated that more observed conflicts among males in the baseline condition were associated with unsuccessful introductions (R2=0.64; p<0.05). Ages and weights of the alpha males were not correlated with later trauma. These findings indicate that the assessment of male breeding cohort behavior prior to female introductions may be helpful in predicting introduction success and help avoid proceeding with introductions with a lower likelihood of success.