Abstract # 1839 Poster # 80:

Scheduled for Thursday, August 17, 2006 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 8 (Regency West 1/3 ) Poster Presentation


Maternal-Fetal Correlation: Circadian,Pharmacological,and Environmental Effects

G. Sackett1, M. Novak1 and C. Kenney1,2
1University of Washington, National Primate Research Center, Box 357330, Seattle, WA, Univ. of Washington, Box 357330, Seattle, WA 98195, USA, 2NIH - NICHD - LCE, NIH Animal Center, P.O. Box 529, Poolesville, MD 20837
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     Few primate prenatal stress studies have actually measured longitudinal effects of the imputed stressor, largely due to lack of methodology. Tethering with catheters and pressure transducers provides such methodology for measuring heart rate and blood pressure with unrestricted movement about the cage. We continuously measured three tethered mother-fetus Macaca nemestrina pairs from catheter implantation at 120 gestational days to delivery. Here we report on cardiovascular variation as a function of circadian period, anti-contraction and antibiotic medication, and presence of human disturbances in the housing room. Time series analyses of the over 5,000,000 seconds of raw data included auto and cross correlation, and regression modeling adjusting for autocorrelation. One fetus that developed microcephaly, possibly due to arterial occlusion, provided a test case for brain damage effects. All factors affected mothers, fetuses, and mother-fetus relationships, but most patterns differed between pairs. The only consistent positive correlation for all three pairs (Pearson r values=.25, .64, .65) was between maternal and fetal heart rate, while only maternal heart rate and fetal blood pressure exhibited a consistent negative correlation (-.19, -.26, -.55). We conclude that, even with only three pairs, the results show very large individual differences in almost all factors studied- differences which were not due to the brain injured pair in any obvious way. Supported by NCRR RR00166, NICHHD 02274, and the intramural research program of the NICHD.