Abstract # 1896 Event # 17:

Scheduled for Thursday, August 17, 2006 11:00 AM-11:15 AM: Session 2 (Regency East #2) Oral Presentation


STRESS AND PAIRING STATUS AFFECT CORTISOL AND VASOPRESSIN, BUT NOT OXYTOCIN, IN TITI MONKEYS (Callicebus cupreus).

K. L. Bales, C. M. Hostetler and S. P. Mendoza
University of California, Dept of Psychology and California National Primate Research Center, Davis, CA 95616, USA
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     The effects of stress on hormones, including cortisol (CORT), arginine vasopressin (AVP), and oxytocin (OT) are often context-, stressor-, and species-specific. In this study we investigated the effects of a mild stressor on plasma levels of CORT, AVP, and OT in the titi monkey, a monogamous New World primate species. Subjects included 6 females and 12 males that were in pair-bonds, as well as 4 males that were housed alone. Each animal underwent 4 test conditions on 4 different days. A baseline blood sample was drawn, then the animal was left quietly in a transport cage for 15, 30, 45, or 60 minutes, at which time a second sample was drawn. After the second sample, the animal was returned to its cage. The latency to contact with its mate, and the initiator of the contact, was recorded. OT and AVP were analyzed by enzyme immunoassay and CORT by radioimmunoassay. Stress resulted in a significant (p <0.05) rise in CORT at all 4 time points; however, lone males had significantly higher CORT than the other three groups at baseline and all stress time points. Stress also resulted in a significant rise in AVP at all 4 time points; however, lone males were higher only at the 30 minute time point. OT did not change after stress nor differ by pairing status. Higher levels of OT were associated with a higher likelihood of initiating contact with a mate. Stress and pairing status were shown to affect OT, AVP, and CORT differentially in a monogamous primate.