Abstract # 47:

Scheduled for Thursday, August 17, 2006 03:00 PM-03:15 PM: Session 6 (Regency East #3) Oral Presentation


COMPARING INFANT PIG-TAILED MACAQUE (MACACA NEMESTRINA) PERFORMANCE ON COMPUTER ADMINISTERED COGNITIVE TESTS TO PERFORMANCE NORMS ESTABLISHED IN THE WISCONSIN GENERAL TESTING APPARATUS

D. J. Mandell
University of Washington, WaNPRC, Department of Psychology, Box 351525, Seattle, WA 98195-1525, USA
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     The purpose of this study was to compare performance on a cognitive battery administered in a computer environment to norms and developmental trends that have been established utilizing a Wisconsin General Testing Apparatus (WGTA). Performance by monkeys that were tested with a touch screen computer (CT group, n = 12) was compared to historic WGTA data (WGTA group, n = 275) on 3 cognitive tasks. Both groups began the battery at approximately 120 post-natal days. The CT group showed comparable performance on 2-object discrimination (Median: WGTA group = 3 days, CT Group = 4 days, p > .10) and reversal learning (Median: WGTA group = 6, CT group = 8 days, p > .10 ) to the WGTA group. The CT group showed poorer performance on learning set than the WGTA group as indicated by the lack of a typical learning curve or discernable response strategy. These performance differences were diminished by administering a spatial search task before learning set in order to match the learning history of the WGTA group. The CT group reached criteria on delayed nonmatch to sample in a comparable amount of test days and trials (Median: days = 21, trials = 525) to published reports with same age monkeys. These results show that the computer environment can elicit performance on cognitive tasks comparable to established norms in the WGTA environment.