Abstract # 1976 Poster # 193:

Scheduled for Friday, August 18, 2006 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 17 (Regency West 1/3 ) Poster Presentation


COMPARATIVE STUDY OF JUVENILE DEVELOPMENT OF BOLIVIAN GREY TITI MONKEYS (Callicebus donacophilus) AND WHITE-FACED SAKIS (Pithecia pithecia) AT CLEVELAND METROPARKS ZOO

C. D. Stimpson and M. A. Norconk
Kent State University, Department of Anthropology, Kent, OH 44242, USA
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     Titi monkeys and white-faced sakis are sister species (Platyrrhini; Pitheciinae), sharing similarities in body size and group size, but differing in mating system, social cohesion, and parental care of infants. Little is known about juvenile development and the trajectory of social development leading to the eventual dispersal of both sons and daughters in these closely related species. The hypothesis that juveniles would show age-related and species-specific differences in social proximity and interactions was tested using both group and focal scans to study two captive groups housed at Cleveland Metroparks Zoo (sakis: 3 juveniles; titi: 4 juveniles) over a period of 24 weeks in 2004. Using Composite scores to weight proximity for each juvenile to others, we found that older juveniles were less likely to be found near any other member than were younger animals (Spearman’s rho, p < 0.02). Furthermore, we calculated a parental ratio (preference of father:mother, where 1 = no preference). As expected, titi juveniles expressed a marked preference for their father (p < 0.001), on average. Saki juveniles, however, balanced their preferences toward same-sexed adults; combined scores did not differ from 1. In addition to parental preference, there was also a preference for members closest in age. Finally, allogrooming and side-by-side sitting were frequent. Data begins to identify behaviors necessary for formation and strengthening of bonds in small primate groups.