Abstract # 2219 Event # 114:

Scheduled for Friday, June 22, 2007 03:00 PM-03:15 PM: Session 12 (North Main Hall E) Oral Presentation


Genetics of temperament in baboons (Papio hamadryas): strong heritability and linkage results from a factor analytical approach

Z. Johnson1, J. C. Lopez-Alvarenga1, L. Brent1,2, A. G. Comuzzie1, J. J. Mann3, J. R. Kaplan4 and J. Rogers1
1Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research, Dept. of Genetics, 7620 N.W. Loop 410, San Antonio, Texas 78227, USA, 2Chimp Haven, 3Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, 4Wake Forest University School of Medicine
line
     While the behavioral genetics of primates is an active field of research, little is known concerning the specific genes that affect intra-species and inter-species variation in behavior. We are investigating the genetic basis of variation in temperament among baboons (Papio hamadryas). We scored 578 baboons for reactivity to three novel objects (toys and mirror), by recording the frequencies and durations of 73 behaviors. Subsequently, CSF was collected to measure metabolites of dopamine (HVA), serotonin (5-HIAA), and norepinephrine (MHPG), which were previously known to be heritable in this population. We used factor analysis to combine behaviors showing significant heritability (h2) into multivariate dimensions reflecting underlying temperament. Factor One (F1) is composed of several anxiety-related behaviors including locomotion, withdrawal, and aggression. F1 accounts for approximately 46% of the total variation, and has an estimated h2 of 0.59. Factor Two (F2) is composed primarily of behaviors related to object interaction, accounts for approximately 20% of variation, and has h2 of 0.33. Factor scores and monoamine levels were used in univariate genome linkage scans to identify quantitative trait loci influencing these phenotypes. Results include significant LOD scores on baboon chromosomes 8 (F2) and 10 (HVA and 5-HIAA), and other suggestive evidence of linkages (F1 and F2). This study is the first to show significant linkage associated with heritable temperamental factors or dimensions in baboons.