Abstract # 18:

Scheduled for Thursday, June 19, 2008 11:15 AM-11:25 AM: Session 2 (Meeting Room 1GHI) Oral Presentation


INTRANASAL VASOPRESSIN ADMINISTRATION EFFECTS ON PAIR-BONDING AND GENE EXPRESSION IN MONOGAMOUS TITI MONKEYS (CALLICEBUS CUPREUS)

M. R. Jarcho1, W. A. Mason2, S. P. Mendoza2 and K. L. Bales1,2
1University of California, Davis, Department of Psychology, Davis, CA 95618, USA, 2California National Primate Research Center
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     Arginine vasopressin (AVP) is a peptide hormone stored in the posterior pituitary with peripheral functions in water regulation and several central functions. We hypothesized that AVP administration would result in increased contact between titi males and their mates, a greater preference for the mate over a strange female, and altered gene expression in genes relevant to social behavior. Seven titi males received each of three intranasal treatments of saline, low AVP (40 IU), or high AVP (80 IU) in random order, one week apart. Following administration, the male was returned to his home-cage and behavior was recorded for 20 minutes.The mate was then removed from the home-cage and males were presented with three social stimuli: the mate, an unfamiliar female, or an empty transfer cage, in random order. Finally, blood samples were taken and assayed both by microarray to measure gene expression, and by enzyme immunoassay for plasma oxytocin (OT), AVP, and cortisol concentrations. Males receiving the high AVP treatment spent marginally more time in contact with their mate [F(2,12)=2.38, p=0.07] and displayed a significantly higher preference for their mate over an unfamiliar female [F(2,12)=3.53, p=0.03]. Males with higher plasma OT were more likely to approach their mate rather than vice versa [logistic regression; a=0.05]. Preference for a pair-mate over an unfamiliar female may be modulated by AVP and OT in male titis.