Abstract # 110:

Scheduled for Sunday, September 20, 2009 11:45 AM-11:55 AM: Session 9 (Del Mar Room) Oral Presentation


OBSERVATIONS OF "KINDA" BABOONS (PAPIO CYNOCEPHALUS KINDAE) IN ZAMBIA: ADULT MALES AS THE ACTIVE PARTNER IN MALE-FEMALE GROOMING DYADS.

J. Phillips-Conroy1,2, C. J. Jolly3 and A. H. Weyher2
1Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, St.Louis, MO 63110, USA, 2Washington University,Department of Anthropology, 3New York University, Department of Anthropology
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Kinda baboons,(Papio cynocephalus kindae) range across the miombo woodland of central Africa, from eastern Zambia, through southern DRC to western Angola. They are generally considered a subspecies of the yellow baboon, but are distinguished from typical P. cynocephalus by small body size and associated short muzzle, reduced sexual dimorphism, silky fur, light-pink circum-orbital skin, and a distinctive midline crest of hair on the head. Uniquely for baboons, they give birth to infants with a white coat. Our observations in Kafue National Park and at Kasanka National Park are based primarily on qualitative data collected in two short field seasons in 2007 and 2008, and suggest that while Kindas display behaviors similar to those of the typical yellow baboons, they differ in a number of unique features. When threatened, females give alarm calls like males in other baboons, and adult males give high-pitched calls, rather than deep “bahoo” barks. Adult males frequently groom lactating females, unlike the grooming interactions seen in the context of friendships in olive and typical yellow baboons. As an example, in one half hour both the male groomed the female continuously, save for two 30 second episodes when the female became the active groomer.The combination of reduced body size dimorphism, reduced behavioral dimorphism, and an unusual pattern of male-female affiliation suggests a distinctive suite of behavioral, morphological and physiological characteristics.