Abstract # 2537 Event # 115:

Scheduled for Sunday, September 20, 2009 03:10 PM-03:30 PM: Session 11 (Mission Bay Ballroom AB) Symposium


ANTIPREDATOR BEHAVIOR (ATTENTION, MOVEMENT, AND ALARM CALLING) DIFFERS BASED ON AGE IN WILD WHITE-FACED CAPUCHIN MONKEYS (CEBUS CAPUCINUS) IN LOMAS BARBUDAL BIOLOGICAL RESERVE, COSTA RICA

W. E. Meno1, R. G. Coss1 and S. E. Perry2
1University of California, Davis, Animal Behavior Graduate Group, Davis, CA, USA, 2University of California, Los Angeles
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In group living primate species, conspecifics can be a valuable information resource. Immature monkeys may be especially observant of their social environment when exposed to potential predators since their smaller size makes them more vulnerable. Infants are expected to pay more attention to their social environment during a predator encounter since their limited experience makes them dependent on information from older individuals. As the monkeys age, they should become more proficient in their predator recognition skills and antipredator behavior and thus less dependent on social cues. Juveniles are predicted to spend more time looking at predators, spend more time stationary, and alarm call more during predator encounters than infants. Rattlesnake and boa constrictor models were presented to 10 infant and 10 juvenile white-faced capuchin monkeys (Cebus capucinus). Focals were the first to find the models and were videotaped until they left the proximity of the snake models. Videos were analyzed for rate of alarm calls, proportion of time spent looking at the model, and proportion of time spent stationary. Infants and juveniles did not differ in rate of alarm calls or proportion of time spent looking at the model. Infants showed a trend of remaining less stationary than juveniles during predator encounters [Planned Comparison; p=0.11]. This difference may indicate that infants move more during predator encounters in order to obtain cues from their social environment.