Abstract # 2569 Poster # 67:

Scheduled for Saturday, September 19, 2009 06:30 PM-09:00 PM: Session 5 (Mission Bay Ballroom CDE) Poster Presentation


PRELIMINARY REPORT ON THE ACADEMIC GENEOLOGY OF MEMBERSHIP OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF PRIMATOLOGISTS

M. K. Hambright1 and K. A. Phillips2
1Humanities and Social Sciences Division, College of Coastal Georgia, Brunswick, GA 31520, USA, 2Departments of Psychology and Biology, Hiram College, Hiram, OH, 44234, USA
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The American Society of Primatologists (ASP) is a collection of scientists, academicians, and students who research interests fall within the relatively young scientific discipline of Primatology. The body of knowledge therein has grown exponentially through both increasing research specialization and interdisciplinary collaboration. We examined the ASP membership in order to construct an academic genealogy that demonstrates the historical continuity and celebrates the diversity of its members in terms of their education and research. All ASP members were invited to participate in an electronic survey in 2008. Sixty-nine percent of the membership completed the survey. Of these, most were female [66.9%]. Members 40 and under comprised 50.8% of the participants, followed in decreasing order by those 41 – 60 [35.8%], 62-80 [4.1%], and over 80 [1.2%]. Most participants were full members [63.8%], followed by students [30.7%], and other [5.5%]. Participants obtained their highest degrees between 1950 and 2008, and 52% did so in the 21st Century. Most participants obtained their highest degree in the field of Anthropology [40.1%], followed by Psychology [25.9%], Biology [16.8%] and Veterinary Medicine [1.8%], although 21.2% indicated other academic areas that were not necessarily exclusive of the four listed. Academic genealogies will be presented. We invite members to contribute to an ongoing record of the society’s evolution.