Abstract # 2578 Poster # 137:

Scheduled for Sunday, September 20, 2009 06:30 PM-09:00 PM: Session 14 (Mission Bay Ballroom CDE) Poster Presentation


A METHODOLOGICAL STUDY OF THE REHABILITATION PROCESS OF WILD- AND CAPTIVE-BORN CHACMA BABOONS (PAPIO CYNOCEPHALUS URSINUS) IN LIMPOPO PROVINCE, SOUTH AFRICA

M. N. Corrales
California State University Chico, Department of Biology, 400 West First Street, Chico, CA 95929, USA
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     With an increase in captive primates due to habitat loss, poaching and the pet trade, animal rehabilitation is a desirable consideration. Located on a protected reserve, the Centre for Animal Rehabilitation and Education (C.A.R.E.) has released 10 troops of rehabilitated chacma baboons (Papio cynocephalus ursinus) with a high level of success. Orphaned, injured and confiscated wild- and captive-born individuals are organized into similar-age troops ranging from 12-22 members. Infants are raised by a single human surrogate parent until the age of six months, at which time the infants receive constant day-time supervision and interaction from multiple people. Human contact is gradually reduced and limited to daily feeding and monitoring, conducted by a small group of people, by the age of 2.5 years. Release into the wild is deemed ideal between the ages of 5-6 years. Appropriate release sites are subjectively determined. A release team initially leads and escorts the troop for a period of 4-8 months until the troop demonstrates competence and confidence in navigating their new territory. Intermittent monitoring is conducted for as long as possible. C.A.R.E. has a survival rate of 70% after one year, and 60% after two years. An understanding of the methodology of a successful rehabilitation program can have great implications for extending rehabilitation as a realistic conservation option for other primate populations, particularly those that are threatened or endangered.