Abstract # 2591 Event # 226:

Scheduled for Monday, September 21, 2009 03:00 PM-03:10 PM: Session 24 (Shell Room) Oral Presentation


PERSONALITY AS A PREDICTOR OF CHRONIC IDIOPATHIC COLITIS IN CAPTIVE RHESUS MACAQUES (MACACA MULATTA)

D. White, S. Howell and J. Wagner
Mannheimer Foundation, Inc., Haman Ranch, Clewiston, FL 33440, USA
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Current literature has reported consistent relationships between personality characteristics and a variety of disease states. This study tested whether personality can be used to predict chronic idiopathic colitis (CIC) subjects. Thirty-five captive macaques [14 males and 19 females, aged between 1 and 19 years of ages], diagnosed with CIC were scored for 50 personality traits. All CIC subjects had been hospitalized for diarrhea for more than three times within 12 months. Twenty-seven traits were found to be consistent [ICC>0.4, Spearman-Brown>0.4, Cronbach’s α>0.4, ANOVA, p>0.01] and factor analysis summarized this into a five-factor model [Hostile, Gregarious, Exploratory, Detached and Sensitive, KMO>0.6, 78% percent of variation]. CIC subjects were more tolerant, solitary, cautious and submissive than the general rhesus population. The model was then tested on 22 additional subjects [11 CIC: 4 females and 7 males aged between 2 and 3 years of age, 11 age and sex-matched controls without CIC] to determine whether personality can predict CIC subjects. Results were not in keeping with current literature that suggests a link between personality and disease. The CIC [11] and Control group [11] did not differ for the five factors and most of the constituent traits [Mann–Whitney U test, p>0.05]. Results suggest personality alone does not predict chronic idiopathic colitis.