Abstract # 2601 Poster # 165:

Scheduled for Sunday, September 20, 2009 06:30 PM-09:00 PM: Session 14 (Mission Bay Ballroom CDE) Poster Presentation


DO FEMALE, CAPTIVE, GRAY MOUSE LEMURS (MICROCEBUS MURINUS) USE MALE ADVERTISEMENT CALLS TO RECOGNIZE MALE PATERNAL KIN?

S. E. Kessler1,2, M. Scheumann2, L. T. Nash1 and E. Zimmermann2
1Arizona State University, School of Human Evolution and Social Change, Box 872402, Tempe, AZ 85287-2402, USA, 2Institute of Zoology, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover
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Paternal kin recognition may enable females to avoid mating with close male kin, however the proximate mechanisms underlying such recognition are difficult to determine. In this study we tested whether 10 nonestrous, female gray mouse lemurs (Microcebus murinus), housed at the University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover in Germany, responded differently to advertisement (mating) calls from their fathers and from an unrelated male when familiarity was controlled. The playback experiments were performed in a sound attenuated chamber and videotaped for frame-by-frame analyses in Interact (v8.0.4). Each female was tested with both types of acoustic stimuli in six sessions. No habituation effects were found either within [Bonferroni corrected Wilcoxon paired sample tests, test-wide α=0.05] or across sessions [Bonferroni corrected Friedman’s tests, test-wide α=0.05]. The behavioral responses (e.g., time spent looking toward the speaker, latency to approach speaker) showed that when familiarity-based cues were controlled, nonestrous females did not respond differently to advertisement calls from paternal kin and nonkin [Bonferroni corrected Wilcoxon paired sample tests performed on individual medians, test-wide α=0.05]. This experiment was the first to test for vocal recognition of kin in a nongregarious, nocturnal strepsirrhine primate.