Abstract # 199:

Scheduled for Monday, September 21, 2009 10:00 AM-10:10 AM: Session 19 (Del Mar Room) Oral Presentation


ADMIXTURE MAPPING AS A TECHNIQUE FOR IDENTIFYING CANDIDATE GENES IN A STRATIFIED HYBRID POPULATION OF CAPTIVE RHESUS MACAQUES (MACACA MULATTA)

J. Satkoski1, S. Kanthaswamy1,2 and D. G. Smith1,2
1University of California, Department of Anthropology, Davis, CA 95616, USA, 2California National Primate Research Center
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A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) map for rhesus macaques will allow researchers to characterize genetic variation present in research populations and to locate candidate genes. However, whole genome analysis (WGA) requires hundreds of thousands of markers, more than have been identified in rhesus macaques. Admixture mapping utilizes preexisting differences in linkage disequilibrium in genetically stratified populations, detecting relationships between phenotypes and mutations, but requires a fraction of the genetic markers necessary for WGA. Although animals from India and China are genetically distinct, the California National Primate Research Center (CNPRC) has been breeding hybrids since the mid-1980’s, producing a genetically homogeneous research population while preserving unique genetic variants. Chindian animals [n=32], plus a sample of Chinese [n=32] and Indian [n=68] animals were genotyped at 14 microsatellite loci. These markers significantly differentiate Indian and Chinese individuals [Principle component analysis, p<0.05], with hybrids distributed in a gradient relative to their Indian ancestry, suggesting sufficient genetic differentiation exists among the hybrid classes for successful admixture mapping. Evaluation of 1400 SNPs distributed throughout the rhesus macaque genome in a sample of 96 Indian and Chinese rhesus macaques identified 125 SNPs absent in one population but at >5% frequency in the other. These SNPs are used to construct a panel for admixture mapping, with emphasis on identifying candidate genes for conditions of biomedical interest. Support: NIH R24RR005090