Abstract # 185:

Scheduled for Monday, September 21, 2009 08:30 AM-08:40 AM: Session 17 (Shell Room) Oral Presentation


HABITAT PARTITIONING AMONG TWO SYMPATRIC SPECIES, ALOUATTA SENICULUS AND SAGUINUS FUSCICOLLIS, IN THE OGLAN ALTO PROTECTED FOREST, ARAJUNO-PASTAZA (ECUADOR).

S. Martin-Solano1,2,6, G. A. Carrillo-Bilbao3,4,5,6 and M. C. Huynen1
1University of Liège, Belgium, Behavioural Biology Unit: Ethology and Animal Psychology, Quai van Beneden 22, Liège, Liège 4020, Belgium, 2FNRS-FRIA, 3Universidad Central del Ecuador, 4Universidad Internacional Menéndez Pelayo, 5Ecociencia, 6Estación Científica JJK, UCE
line
     

Even though the communities of primate species are common, the benefits and consequences of these communities for the species and their environments are not well known. The aim of the study was to investigate habitat sharing in sympatric troops of Alouatta seniculus and Saguinus fuscicollis. The monitoring was done by walking one global trail system from 6 am to 6 pm during 9 months. The census of primates in our study was based on direct and indirect observations (audio recording, faecal sampling, food consumption traces, etc.). For each encounter with a troop, a precise record was kept of the location, group composition, number of individuals, and strata occupied in the canopy. The home range average of the howler monkeys is 22.6 ha and 26.5 ha for the tamarin group, with a 14 ha overlap between the ranges of the two species. The howler monkeys were principally observed in primary forest middle canopy [62.5% of the observations and 12.5% in each of the other strata - subcanopy, lower and upper canopy]. The saddleback tamarins were mostly registered both in the primary and secondary forest understory [33%] and middle canopy [33%] and for 11.11% in each of the other strata. Saddleback tamarins are seen in more strata than howler monkeys. Habitat partitioning studies are important to better understand the dynamics of primate communities and set up conservation strategies.