Abstract # 2728 Poster # 77:

Scheduled for Saturday, September 19, 2009 06:30 PM-09:00 PM: Session 5 (Mission Bay Ballroom CDE) Poster Presentation


FRAGMENTATION WITHIN MATRILINEAL PEDIGREES IS ASSOCIATED WITH FRAGMENTATION IN GROOMING NETWORKS OF CAPTIVE RHESUS MACAQUES (MACACA MULATTA)

B. A. Beisner1, M. E. Jackson1, A. Cameron1, J. C. Flack2, D. C. Krakauer2 and B. McCowan1,3
1California National Primate Research Center, University of California Davis, Davis, CA 95616, USA, 2Santa Fe Institute, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501, USA, 3Department of Population Health & Reproduction, School of Veterinary Medicine, UC Davis, Davis, CA 95616
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Social groups of rhesus macaques consist of clusters of maternally related adult females and their offspring, also known as matrilines, and females typically exhibit a preference for associating with kin. This kin bias likely develops from association with one’s mother; thus siblings recognize one another as kin through association with a common mother who connects them. When such “connector” females are absent from the group, affiliative ties among collateral kin may weaken, resulting in fragmentation in the grooming network. At the California National Primate Research Center, we recorded dyadic grooming interactions from members of 16 matrilines [four groups] using a scan sampling design to evaluate the degree of fragmentation in grooming interactions (measured as the number of communities in the grooming network) with respect to the number of connecting females in the matriline who are absent from the group. Regression analysis revealed a positive relationship between the number of communities in the grooming network and the number of connecting females missing from the matriline [p=0.007]. Comparison of these data with the occurrence of social overthrows at the CNPRC suggests that a high degree of fragmentation in multiple matrilines of a group may contribute to group instability and social overthrow.