Abstract # 164:

Scheduled for Sunday, September 20, 2009 06:30 PM-09:00 PM: Session 14 (Mission Bay Ballroom CDE) Poster Presentation


DOES THE METHOD USED FOR TIME MEASUREMENT IN A PRIMATE COGNITION STUDY AFFECT THE RESULTS?

T. M. Larson1, J. L. White2 and M. F. Bonnan3
1Western Illinois University, Department of Biological Science, Macomb, IL 61455, USA, 2Western Illinois University, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, 3Western Illinois University, Department of Biological Science
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Fourteen species of primates from the Henson Robinson Zoo and the Dallas Zoo were part of a cognition study that measured the amount of time taken to solve a puzzle enrichment device (a Plexiglas cube with a pivoting lid). Each session was recorded and two different types of time measurements were collected, total time (sum of time from access until solved (opened and treat removed)), and total interaction time (sum of time spent interacting with the device until solved). Non-parametric Kruskal–Wallis tests were ran on both data sets at the species and superfamily levels. At the superfamily level there was no significant difference in total time between superfamilies, however total interaction time showed that Lemuroidea had a significantly higher solve time than Cercopithecoidea [p=0.0019, α=0.05]. At the species level total time showed that Eulemur macaco (Black Lemur) was significantly different from both Callicebus donacophilus (Titi Monkey) and Varecia variegata (Black and White Ruffed Lemur) [p<0.0001, α=0.05] while total interaction time showed that Varecia variegata was significantly different from both Nomascus leucogenys (White Cheeked Gibbon) and Cercopithecus mona (Mona Monkey) [p< 0.0001, α=0.05]. It appears that the use and analysis of multiple measures of time may provide a better picture of how different species perform on cognitive tasks.