Abstract # 2748 Event # 215:

Scheduled for Monday, September 21, 2009 01:45 PM-01:55 PM: Session 23 (Mission Bay Ballroom AB) Oral Presentation


INSECT FORAGING STRATEGIES OF THE RIO MAYO TITI MONKEY (CALLICEBUS OENANTHE) IN A FRAGMENTED FOREST, NORTHERN PERU

A. M. DeLuycker
Butler University, Department of History and Anthropology, Indianapolis, IN 46208, USA
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Notable interspecific variation in the percent of time devoted to feeding on insects is exhibited by members of the genus Callicebus, ranging from 0% (C. melanochir; C. personatus) to 20% (C. torquatus; C. brunneus). I investigated the importance of insects in the diet of C. oenanthe, a little known species living in San Martín, Peru. As part of a larger socioecological study, a total of 28,396 sample focal points were collected, representing 946 hours (January to August 2005). Variables used to quantify foraging mode were grouped into three categories: exposed prey foraging (lunge/grab), hidden prey foraging (bite/inspect), and stealth foraging (scan). From total feeding and foraging records [n=4908], insects represented 22% of the diet. Insects from at least six orders were identified. Overall, the major type of insect foraging was hidden prey foraging [51.4%], followed by stealth foraging [28.9%] and exposed prey foraging [19.7%]. C. oenanthe was mainly an investigative insect forager, manipulating easy-to-open substrates (e.g. rolled up leaves), and exhibited a high insect capture success rate [83%]. The dietary inclusion of insect prey for C. oenanthe may be especially important during periods of resource scarcity in fragmented forest, and emphasizes the plasticity in feeding adaptations in Callicebus.