Abstract # 2749 Poster # 150:

Scheduled for Sunday, September 20, 2009 06:30 PM-09:00 PM: Session 14 (Mission Bay Ballroom CDE) Poster Presentation


DEGREE OF CHINESE ANCESTRY AFFECTS BEHAVIORAL RESPONSIVENESS OF INFANT RHESUS MACAQUES (MACACA MULATTA): A PRELIMINARY ANALYSIS

J. Jiang1,2 and J. P. Capitanio1,2
1Psychology Department, One Shields Avenue, University of California, Davis, CA 95616-8686, USA, 2California National Primate Research Center, Davis, CA
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Many biomedical researchers have reservations about using Chinese-origin or Chinese-Indian hybrids in research, because of behavioral and physiological differences that have been found. Typically, however, studies have not examined degree of Chinese ancestry (DCA), nor have large sample sizes been used. Using data collected as part of a colony-wide BioBehavioral Assessment program, we examined whether DCA was related to behavioral responses to a 25-hr separation from mother and relocation occurring at 3-4 months of age. The 84 subjects, born and reared in outdoor half-acre enclosures, were classified as 0% Chinese [pure Indian: n=45, Group 1]; 6% to 70% Chinese [n=19, Group 2], and 75% to 100% Chinese [n=20, Group 3], which was based on acquisition records and parentage analysis. Using sex and test age as covariates, repeated measures ANOVA [α=0.05] showed that DCA had a significant effect on emotionality [p=0.01]. Post-hoc tests showed that the score of Group 2 was higher than Groups 1 and 3, which were not different from each other. These data suggest that pure Indian and near-pure Chinese infant rhesus show similar patterns of emotionality, and that the greater emotional responsiveness among more mixed hybrids may reflect hybrid vigor.