Abstract # 2765 Event # 87:

Scheduled for Sunday, September 20, 2009 10:55 AM-11:10 AM: Session 7 (Mission Bay Ballroom AB) Oral Presentation


POPULATION ASSESSMENT OF THE SULAWESI BLACK MACAQUES (MACACA NIGRA) AT THE TANGKOKO NATURE RESERVE, NORTH SULAWESI, INDONESIA

R. C. Kyes1,2,3,4, E. Iskandar3, J. Onibala4, S. Laatung4, H. Lapin4, F. Huettmann6, J. Hollister-Smith5 and B. Feguson2,5
1Dept. of Psychology, Center for Global Field Study, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA, 2Washington National Primate Research Center, Seattle, Washington, 3Primate Research Center, Bogor Agricultural Univ., Bogor, Indonesia, 4Faculty of Animal Sciences, Sam Ratulangi Univ., Manado, North Sulawesi, Indonesia, 5Oregon National Primate Research Center, Beaverton, Oregon, 6Department of Biology and Wildlife, Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska-Fairbanks
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     The Sulawesi black macaque population at Tangkoko Nature Reserve in North Sulawesi, Indonesia has been the focus of periodic assessment since the late 1970s. Although past surveys have shown ongoing decline, our survey data, collected over the past 10 years (1999-2008), indicate a relatively stable population in the reserve core. Annual surveys of the Tangkoko population were conducted each May (1999-2002 & 2005-2008) during a two to three-week period. Line-transect sampling was performed along a single 3.2-3.6km transect that ran up the north slope of Mt. Tangkoko. Between 16-28 survey samples (representing 51.2-100.8km, strip width=100m) were completed each year. Group density estimates have remained relatively consistent across the study period [mean=3.6 groups/km2] as has group size [mean=11.7 individuals; range: 2-71]. Estimated abundance during 2008 was 43.8 individuals/km2. Although group density estimates are considered accurate, group size may be underestimated. We are now expanding our study to include genetic assessment of the population. DNAs isolated from fecal samples are currently being analyzed to assess genetic diversity. Our collaborative program also includes annual field courses in primate conservation biology (since 1998), community outreach education in conservation for local schoolchildren, and support of undergraduate and graduate student research in the reserve. These activities are part of a program designed to help conserve this critically endangered population. Supported by NIH Grant RR-00166, Woodland Park Zoo, and One Earth Institute.