Abstract # 2791 Event # 132:

Scheduled for Saturday, June 19, 2010 11:15 AM-11:25 AM: Session 24 (Medallion Ballroom A) Oral Presentation


GROOMING KIN BIAS VARIES WITH BOTH SOCIAL STYLE AND GROUP SIZE: A COMPARISON OF CAYO SANTIAGO RHESUS (M. MULATTA), CORRAL-LIVING TONKEAN (M. TONKEANA) AND WILD TIBETAN (M. THIBETANA) MACAQUES AT HUANGSHAN, CHINA.

C. M. Berman1 and B. Thierry2
1University at Buffalo, Department of Anthropology, 380 MFAC, Ellicott Complex, North Campus, Buffalo, NY 14261, USA, 2Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Université Louis Pasteur
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Primate species with despotic social styles are hypothesized to show more intense kin bias in affiliative interaction than more tolerant species. Yet measures of affiliative kin bias are not always useful in distinguishing between despotic and tolerant species. Given recent evidence that grooming kin bias in macaques is related to numbers of available grooming partners, we ask whether measures of grooming kin bias can distinguish between social styles provided numbers of potential partners are controlled. We examine the relationships between female grooming kin bias and group size in three macaque species with different social styles, using data collected on the same groups over time: rhesus (despotic, 8 time periods), Tonkean (tolerant, 5 periods) and Tibetan (uncertain, 7 periods). ANCOVA analysis revealed significant effects for both species [F=4.1(2,16), p=0.037] and numbers of females [F=45.7(1,16), p<0.001]. All species showed positive relationships (with similar slopes) between kin bias and numbers of females. When number of females was controlled, kin bias was greater for rhesus than Tonkeans [t=2.1, p=0.05]. Values for Tibetans were greater than for Tonkeans (t=2.6, p=0.018), but indistinguishable from rhesus [t=0, ns]. These results suggest that grooming kin bias can distinguish between despotic and tolerant macaques species if the availability of grooming partners is considered. On this basis, Tibetan macaques more closely fit criteria for despotic than tolerant macaques.