Abstract # 62:

Scheduled for Friday, June 18, 2010 10:45 AM-11:10 AM: Session 12 (Medallion Ballroom A/B) Symposium


THE SOCIAL CONTEXT OF INTERSPECIFIC PRIMATE PATHOGEN EXCHANGE: IMPLICATIONS FOR PRIMATE CONSERVATION AND GLOBAL HEALTH

T. R. Gillespie
Emory University, The Global Health Institute and Department of Environmental Studies, 400 Dowman Drive, E510, Atlanta, Georgia 30322, USA
line
     

Recent evidence that even mildly pathogenic human respiratory pathogens are capable of causing severe population declines in wild apes, coupled with the natural threats of ebola and anthrax to wild ape populations, has sparked considerable debate concerning the costs and benefits to surviving endangered primate populations of scientific research, ecotourism, and current conservation and management paradigms. Equally disturbing, the close phylogenetic relationship between humans and nonhuman primates, coupled with the exponential expansion of human populations and human activities within primate habitats, has resulted in exceptionally high potential for pathogen emergence in human populations. This talk will explore how epidemiology, molecular ecology, behavioral ecology, social and clinical survey, and spatially explicit modeling can be integrated to examine how the behaviors of free-ranging primates and humans influence the risks of interspecific pathogen exchange. The ultimate products of such efforts are implementable plans for protecting human and nonhuman primate health, while simultaneously ensuring the sustainability of the ecosystems within which they live.