Abstract # 2796 Poster # 103:

Scheduled for Friday, June 18, 2010 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 18 (Medallion Ballroom C/D/E/F) Poster Presentation


SOCIAL BONDS IN TITI MONKEYS (CALLICEBUS CUPREUS) AFFECT AROUSAL, AFFILIATION, AND RESPONSE TO REWARD

B. Ragen1,2, S. P. Mendoza2, W. A. Mason2 and K. L. Bales1,2
1University of California, Davis, Department of Psychology, One Shields Ave, Davis, CA, USA, 2California National Primate Research Center
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Social bonds, food, and sex activate similar reward neural circuitry; the reinforcing effects of social attachment can be stronger than rewarding stimuli such as cocaine. Since the monogamous titi monkey forms strong heterosexual social bonds, we tested eighteen male titi monkeys to determine whether social bonding status, and the presence or absence of their attachment figure affected their preference for an external rewarding stimulus (Tang). Groups included six males living alone (Lone), six males in a pair-bond with a female (Paired), and six males living in their natal group with their parents (Natal). Each subject underwent eight 30-minute test sessions where they were presented with a bottle of Tang and a bottle of water. Paired and Natal males underwent half of the sessions alone and half with their attachment figure. Drinking behavior, affiliative behavior, and arousal behavior were scored. Paired males spent significantly more time drinking Tang compared to Lone males [Mann-Whitney U=36, P=0.047] but not natal males. Paired males engaged in significantly more physical contact [U=25, P=0.03] and tail-twining [U=27, P=0.028] compared to Natal males. Natal males tested without their attachment figure engaged in significantly more chest rubbing than Lone males [U=27, P=0.028]. Social bond status and the presence of an attachment figure affect arousal, affiliation, and response to reward in male titi monkeys. Support: HD053555, RR00169 and the Good Nature Institute.