Abstract # 70:

Scheduled for Friday, June 18, 2010 04:00 PM-04:10 PM: Session 15 (Medallion Ballroom A) Oral Presentation


DIFFERENTIAL INTROGRESSION OF CODING SNPS FROM MACACA MULATTA INTO M. FASCICULARIS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR INTER- AND INTRASPECIES PHENOTYPIC VARIATION

J. Satkoski Trask1,2, S. Kanthaswamy1,2 and D. G. Smith1,2
1University of California, Department of Anthropology, 330 Young Hall, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, USA, 2California National Primate Research Center
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The increased popularity of the cynomolgous macaque (M. fascicularis) as a subject of biomedical research, transplantation studies and drug testing has been confronted by a relative dearth of information on population genetics and interpopulation phenotypic variation.  When combined with nonspecific data on animal origins, the implications for research combining animals from multiple geographic populations could be serious.  We genotyped 800 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) originally discovered in rhesus macaques [N=56] and shared with cynomolgous macaques [N=22].  Samples were collected from regions: the Philippines [n=5], Mauritius [n=5], Malay Peninsula [n=5], Indonesia [n=5] and Vietnam [n=5].  Of the SNPs, 246 were located in regions of the rhesus macaque genome identified by NCBI as within genes, with 90 SNPs segregating in at least one population of cynomolgous macaque.  The majority of those 90 SNPs [N=38 or 42%] were polymorphic among Vietnamese cynomolgus macaques and monomorphic among insular cynomolgus macaques. Only 8% of these genic SNPs were polymorphic in all populations.  Although the large number of shared polymorphisms suggests interspecific hybridization, the markers shared with larger numbers of populations are likely polymorphisms that predate the rhesus-cynomolgous split, possibly maintained by selection.  We examined the position of these polymorphisms within their respective genes, identified them as coding, noncoding, or regulating and identify their impact on potential phenotypic differences both between geographic populations of cynomolgous macaques and between the species.