Abstract # 2812 Poster # 100:

Scheduled for Friday, June 18, 2010 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 18 (Medallion Ballroom C/D/E/F) Poster Presentation


HIGH SOCIAL RANK AND OLDER AGE ARE ASSOCIATED WITH INCREASED INFLAMMATION IN FEMALE RHESUS MACAQUES (MACACA MULATTA).

T. Pace1, G. R. Smith2 and K. M. McCormack3,4
1Emory University, School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Winship Cancer Institute, 1365-C Clifton Rd., Atlanta, GA 30322, USA, 2College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, 3Psychology Department, Spelman College, Atlanta, GA, 4Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University, Atlanta, GA
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Across many species, associations have been reported between social status and health outcomes. The direction of these associations differs, depending on the structure of the social group. The current project investigated the degree to which rank and age were associated with circulating inflammatory markers in 110 rhesus macaques. Subjects were socially housed females, who ranged in age from 5-25 years. Basal blood samples were obtained from each animal for the assessment of plasma concentrations of interleukin (IL-6), and social rank was calculated by experienced observers. To examine the influence of rank (high, low) and age (young--lower quartile, old--upper quartile) on circulating levels of IL-6, an ANCOVA was used that controlled for the amount of time it took to obtain the blood samples. There was a significant interaction between rank and age [F(1,36)=5.44, P=0.03]. High-ranking old animals had significantly greater IL-6 than high-ranking young animals, and low-ranking old animals. There were no differences in IL-6 between the old and young low-ranking animals, or between the high and low-young ranking animals. These results suggest that, over the long-term, maintaining a high social status may promote the development of a proinflammatory phenotype in rhesus macaques. Increased inflammation has been associated with the development of several chronic illnesses including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and major depression in humans and other animals. Support: IBN-9876754(STC Program, NSF), RR00165(Yerkes).