Abstract # 68:

Scheduled for Friday, June 18, 2010 03:30 PM-03:40 PM: Session 15 (Medallion Ballroom A) Oral Presentation


SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT OF YOUNG MONKEYS (M. NEMESTRINA) GIVEN THE ATYPICAL NEUROLEPTIC DRUGS RISPERIDONE AND QUETIAPINE

G. Sackett and B. Crouthamel
University of Washington, National Primate Research Center, Center on Human Development and Disability, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
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Atypical neuroleptic drugs are prescribed to young children, but effects on their social development have received little experimental study. We studied effects of placebo and two atypicals, risperidone and quetiapine, on social behavior of 40 9-24 month old, mother-reared, pigtail monkeys, modeling effects on 4-8 year old children. Daily 30-min 4-male play groups were studied during four 4-month phases: Predrug, Low Dose, High Dose, Postdrug. Each group included two dosed and two placebo subjects, totaling 10 monkeys in each drug-placebo combination. ANOVA models studied month, drug, and type (dosed or placebo) chronic effects, and acute change from one phase to the next. Observational data yielded duration and frequency of inactive, positive (exploration, play, sex), and negative (fear, withdrawal, “abnormal”) nonsocial and social behaviors. Negative behaviors were rare [no mean >1.0] and not analyzed. Acute drug effects occurred on all behaviors, usually with different directions of effect for each drug. Nonsocial behaviors had few chronic effects. Positive social behavior increased with quetiapine at low dose, and risperidone at high dose. Surprisingly, most drug effects occurred in both the dosed and the placebo monkeys. Thus, drug effects were pervasive for all individuals in these small groups. Almost all drug effects dissipated over the 4-month postdrug period, suggesting few, if any, long lasting drug effects on pre-adolescent social behavior. Supported by NIH MH064647, RR00166 and HD02774.