Abstract # 2825 Event # 142:

Scheduled for Saturday, June 19, 2010 03:15 PM-03:25 PM: Session 25 (Medallion Ballroom B) Oral Presentation


AFFILIATIVE MALE-MALE INTERACTIONS IN FREE-RANGING BEARDED SAKI MONKEYS IN BROWNSBERG NATURE PARK, SURINAME

T. Gregory and M. A. Norconk
Kent State University, Department of Anthropology, Kent, Ohio 44242, USA
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Bearded sakis (Chiropotes spp.) and uacaris (Cacajao spp.) remain among the least known platyrrhines, yet existing data suggest that they share similarities with other primates that form multi-male-centered groups (e.g., chimpanzees and atelines). Chiropotes sagulatus social behavior and ecology were studied at Brownsberg Nature Park, Suriname from March 2008-April 2009. All-occurrence sampling of social behavior [N=289 observations during 22 all-day and 84 partial-day follows] yielded a strong bias in male-male affiliative behaviors. Males were highly social (at least one male was involved in 88.5% of observations) and male-male partners represented 68.7% of observations where the sexes of at least two individuals were identified (more than two males were involved in 47 cases). Behaviors were affiliative in 100% of male-male interactions. These data corroborate previous studies that also observed affiliative male-male relationships in Chiropotes and also add to our definition of affiliative behaviors among males (e.g., piling up, lining up, body rubbing, seasonal scrotum color changes, and formation of multi-day sub-groups containing three-four adult males and a juvenile). Ecological data from this study demonstrate that bearded sakis form large groups (up to 45 members) and are highly mobile [travel rate=38.0±55.1m/10 minutes, day path=2.4±0.8km/day, change in elevation=544±198m/day, home range=500+ha]. Affiliative male-male relationships may facilitate group cohesion by reducing intragroup aggression, enabling large group sizes, high mobility, and exploitation of widely dispersed resources such as fruit and seeds.