Abstract # 2858 Event # 114:

Scheduled for Saturday, June 19, 2010 09:45 AM-09:55 AM: Session 19 (Mezzanine Ballroom A/B/C/D) Oral Presentation


FEEDING BEHAVIOR OF SIMAKOBU MONKEYS (SIMIAS CONCOLOR) INHABITING NORTH PAGAI ISLAND, MENTAWAI ISLANDS, INDONESIA

L. M. Paciulli, M. Daniels and N. Baptist
University of West Georgia, Department of Anthropology, Carrollton, GA 30118, USA
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Simakobu monkeys (Simias concolor) are one of four endangered and endemic primate species inhabiting the Mentawai Islands (West Sumatra, Indonesia). They have been designated as one of the 25 most endangered primates in the world. Despite this, there are few publications on habituated simakobus. The current study represents the first account of the feeding behavior of two groups (n1=2, n2=3) of habituated simakobus in the Betumonga region of North Pagai Island. Five-minute instantaneous focal animal sampling was used to collect data on all feeding activities during 500 hours of full-day follows in 1997. The simakobus spent ~44% of the day foraging or feeding, and split their time eating young leaves [30%], flowers [33%], and fruit [32%]. The simakobus spent more time feeding than the sympatric colobine, the Mentawai Island leaf langur (Presbytis Potenziani) [26%: Fuentes 1994], and twice as much time feeding as its’ closest living relative, the proboscis monkey (Nasalis larvatus) [19.5%: Matsuda 2009]. Moreover, the percent of time simakobus spend feeding appears to be at the upper limit of the African colobine feeding range. Thus, these first data on the feeding behavior of habituated simakobus seem to indicate that they spend more time feeding than the average colobine. One possible ecological explanation for this could be that they are living in a low quality habitat. Support: Fulbright, PCI, Douroucouli Foundation, UWG SRAP.