Abstract # 2866 Poster # 55:

Scheduled for Thursday, June 17, 2010 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 11 (Medallion Ballroom C/D/E/F) Poster Presentation


FAMILY FACES: RELATEDNESS AND FACIAL SIMILARITY IN RHESUS MACAQUES

S. Bower, A. Paukner and S. J. Suomi
Laboratory of Comparative Ethology, NIH Animal Center, P.O. Box 529, Poolesville, VA 20837, USA
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Kin recognition is a valuable evolutionary skill which is especially relevant to social organisms. Different species make use of a wide array of techniques in order to recognize kin or those likely to be kin. Facial similarity is one cue often used by humans as a marker for relatedness. We measured and analyzed the facial structure of 63 adult female rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Subjects were either related as paternal half sisters or unrelated. Principal component analysis revealed 5 constructs which accounted for 75.9% of the variance in facial measurements. Difference scores of two constructs (related to eye and upper lip areas) were significantly smaller between related than between unrelated monkeys [t-tests: α=0.05]. These results suggest that there are cues in rhesus macaque facial structure which may be used as markers for relatedness.