Abstract # 137:

Scheduled for Saturday, June 19, 2010 02:00 PM-02:10 PM: Session 25 (Medallion Ballroom B) Oral Presentation


FEMALE-MALE PROXIMITY DURING EARLY DEVELOPMENT AS A POSSIBLE CUE TO PATERNITY IN WHITE-FACED CAPUCHIN MONKEYS (CEBUS CAPUCINUS)

I. Godoy and S. E. Perry
University of California, Los Angeles, Department of Anthropology, and Center for Behavior, Evolution, and Culture, Los Angeles, California 90095-1553, USA
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In capuchins, closely related individuals are commonly found in the same group and have the potential to select each other as mates. Nonetheless, capuchins exhibit father-daughter inbreeding avoidance, though little is known about the mechanisms of kin discrimination. Demographic factors such as high male reproductive skew and long alpha tenures make it likely that alpha males are related to infants in their groups. Here we explore whether patterns of proximity during early development reflect paternal relatedness. We present proximity data on opposite-sex dyads collected from 10 minute focal follows of infant females [689 focal hours, N=12] at Lomas Barbudal, Costa Rica. During the first year of life, the median percentage of time spent around alpha males was 11.4% compared to 3.8% around adult subordinate males. Of 12 female-alpha dyads, 6 were daughter-father (D-F), 3 granddaughter-grandfather (GD-GF), and 3 non-kin (NK). Though yearlong mean values for percentage of time spent together only differed slightly according to kin categories [13.7% for D-F, 13.3% for GD-GF, 10.2% for NK], differences were more pronounced during the earlier half of the first year [14.1% for D-F, 16.3% for GD-GF, 7.9% for NK]. We propose that the early familiarity between infant females and alpha males may serve as a cue to relatedness, which individuals can use when making mating decisions later in life.