Abstract # 66:

Scheduled for Friday, June 18, 2010 03:00 PM-03:10 PM: Session 15 (Medallion Ballroom A) Oral Presentation


DEMONSTRATION OF ACTIVE IRON TRANSPORT FROM MATERNAL-TO-FETAL COMPARTMENTS USING STABLE IRON ISOTOPE TECHNIQUES IN LABORATORY-RAISED RHESUS MONKEYS (MACACA MULATTA)

G. R. Lubach, H. R. Crispen and C. L. Coe
University of Wisconsin, Harlow Primate Laboratory, Department of Psychology, 22 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53715, USA
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Iron is an essential nutrient for infant development. The iron stores that infants are born with are obtained via placental transfer late in pregnancy. In order to quantify iron transfer between mother and fetus, we are using stable iron isotopes that have been safely used in pregnant women. Two weeks before term, two nonradioactive isotopes, one intravenous and one oral, are administered to the pregnant female. An iron citrate (58Fe) solution, at 0.06 mg/ml, is infused IV and a ferrous sulfate (57Fe) solution, at 0.4 mg/ml, is given orally. This technique allows an assessment of red cell incorporation of iron in both mother and fetus. We can distinguish between iron that goes to the placenta directly via the blood stream, versus after gut absorption. Iron incorporated into the developing infant’s red blood cells can be tracked after birth. Iron quantification and iron isotope ratio measurements are done with an ICP-MS. To date, eight mother-infant pairs have been assessed. At birth, the neonates show a greater enrichment over the amount of isotope their mothers retained [58Fe: mothers=27.56%, infants=34.97%; 57Fe: mothers=6.67%, infants=7.87%]. A higher percentage of blood-perfused iron (58Fe) reaches the fetus, demonstrating the active placental transfer. Our hypothesis is that maternal illness and stress will have a greater impact on gut-derived iron.