Abstract # 2890 Poster # 98:

Scheduled for Friday, June 18, 2010 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 18 (Medallion Ballroom C/D/E/F) Poster Presentation


HOW VARIANT REARING PATTERNS AND FLUOXETINE AFFECTS STRESS AND FEAR RESPONSE BEHAVIORS IN ADOLESCENT RHESUS MACAQUES (MACACA MULATTA)

E. Johnson1, A. Brockett1, K. N. Herman2,3, K. Vaughan1, D. Delaney1, A. Cummins1, J. Fellows1, P. Noble1, S. J. Suomi2, J. T. Winslow1 and E. E. Nelson1
1National Institute of Mental Health, 16701 Elmer School Rd, Bldg 110, Room 119, Dickerson, MD 20842, USA, 2National Institute of Child Health and Development, 3University of Maryland
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Recent evidence has implicated the use of SSRIs and environmental circumstances with destructive behavior in adolescence. Pharmacological testing in humans is often hindered by ethical constraints. This study used adolescent rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) to examine the interface between manipulated rearing environments and fluoxetine in stressful and threatening situations. The study used the Human Intruder paradigm in which monkeys were exposed to a non-threatening acclimation period, a stressful profile (no eye-contact) period, and a threatening stare (eye-contact) period. The present study found that monkeys raised under the Mother-Reared condition (MR) displayed locomotive behavior more frequently than those in the Peer-Reared condition (PR) [F(1,23)=8.0416, P<0.01]. Furthermore within the acclimation period, all monkeys showed more locomotive behavior than when in the stressful or threatened condition [F(2,46)=49.620, P<0.001]. There were no significant differences between fluoxetine and control subjects. Preliminary analysis indicates that locomotive behavior is significantly affected by rearing conditions and environment (i.e., acclimation, profile, and stare). Even in the presence of early adversity, our findings demonstrate that there are no adverse affects of fluoxetine during threatening social conditions.