Abstract # 85:

Scheduled for Friday, June 18, 2010 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 18 (Medallion Ballroom C/D/E/F) Poster Presentation


IS HIGH URINARY GLUCOSE IN CAPTIVE TITI MONKEYS (CALLICEBUS CUPREUS) RELATED TO SOCIAL CONDITION AND HYPERCORTISOLEMIA? A PRESENTATION OF CLINICAL CASES.

N. Maninger1, S. P. Mendoza1, K. Hinde1, S. D. Tardif2, K. D. Laugero3 and K. L. Bales1,4
1California National Primate Research Center, Brain, Mind & Behavior Unit, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA, 2Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, University of Texas Health Science Center, 3Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture, 4Department of Psychology, University of California, Davis
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Hypercortisolemia is common among New World monkeys. In titi monkeys high cortisol seems to occur with social disruption – separation from attachment figure (mate or father) and birth of new infants. However, these high levels of cortisol can be transitory, since formation of new heterosexual pairs results in reduction of cortisol to pre-separation levels. Recently, our titi monkey colony has had a number of hyperglycemic monkeys. Because (1) hypercortisolemia is an underlying cause of hyperglycemia and (2) many of our titi monkeys are currently living in social conditions associated with hypercortisolemia, we hypothesized that social condition affects urinary glucose in our animals. Morning (0600 h) urine samples were collected and glucose was measured using commercial test strips. Case studies will be presented for discussion of our hypothesis. Case 1: adult male with diabetic levels of urinary glucose (2000 mg/dl) was paired with a female, and 8 days later no glucose was detected. Case 2: young male with undetectable glucose was removed from his family, and 9 days later his glucose was >1000 mg/dl. These data suggest that urinary glucose is labile and associated with social condition in titi monkeys. While high urinary glucose is used as an indicator of diabetes in humans and Old World monkeys, we should be cautious in applying this to New World monkeys. Supported by: HD053555, RR00169, and the Good Nature Institute.