Abstract # 2920 Event # 8:

Scheduled for Thursday, June 17, 2010 10:45 AM-10:55 AM: Session 2 (Medallion Ballroom A) Oral Presentation


EFFECTS OF RELOCATION ON IMMUNOLOGICAL MEASURES IN TWO CAPTIVE NONHUMAN PRIMATE SPECIES: SQUIRREL MONKEYS AND OWL MONKEYS

L. E. Williams, P. N. Nehete, S. J. Schapiro and S. P. Lambeth
Michale E. Keeling Center for Comparative Medicine, DVS, UTMDACC, Bastrop, TX 78602, USA
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Studies have shown that life-event stressors are associated with changes in immune system, which decrease a patient’s ability to fight infections. These studies show a positive relationship between how an individual handles stress and different measures of the immune system (such as natural killer cell activity and white blood cells). One such stressor occurs when nonhuman primates are relocated from one condition and/or facility to another for research purposes. The present study examines data collected during the relocation of two nonhuman primate colonies, squirrel monkeys and owl monkeys, from Mobile, AL to Bastrop, TX. Samples were taken from a subset of animals just prior to shipment and again immediately upon arrival, approximately 24 hours later. In addition to significant differences in hematological and serum chemistry profiles, there were significant differences in immunological responses to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and poke-weed mitogen (PWM) stimulation. Cell counts of CD3, CD4, CD8, and CD20 also differed. These changes not only have implications for the welfare of relocated nonhuman primates, they also provide added evidence for the effects of life-event stressors on an animal’s immune system. Further research in this arena is needed to determine not only the physiological, but also the behavioral effects of the transportation and relocation process on nonhuman primates.