Abstract # 2928 Event # 150:

Scheduled for Saturday, June 19, 2010 03:00 PM-03:10 PM: Session 27 (Mezzanine Ballroom A/B/C/D) Oral Presentation


ASSOCIATION BETWEEN HYBRID STATUS AND REPRODUCTIVE SUCCESS OF MALE AND FEMALE RHESUS MACAQUES (MACACA MULATTA)

S. Kanthaswamy1,2, A. Kou2, J. Satkoski-Trask1 and D. G. Smith1,2
1Department of Anthropology, UC Davis, One Shields Ave, Davis, CA95616, Davis, USA, 2California National Primate Research Center, UC Davis, One Shields Ave, Davis, CA95616
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The California National Primate Research Center (CNPRC) maintains over 1000 rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) of mixed Chinese-Indian ancestry. Most hybrid animals are in half-acre outdoor field cages, the colony’s long-term breeding resource, and represent an increasing proportion of the colony. Since 2001, hybrid animals, ascertained based on colony records, have comprised between 4 and 49% of the outdoor field cage population and in most cages represented a maximum of 10% of the entire cage population. The increasing prevalence of hybrid animals is partly due to management efforts to distribute genetic diversity effectively by encouraging gene flow. Other factors including their socio-behavioral and physical attributes could have also caused the rapid, widespread and continued dispersal of Chinese rhesus genes throughout the colony. For example, anecdotal observations of mixed groups of hybrid and pure Indian animals suggest that hybrids are more reproductively successful. A study of the parentage of 117 and 219 offspring, produced by males and females, respectively, over eight breeding seasons revealed that the reproductive success (RS) of the hybrid animals was higher than that of the pure bred Indian cage-mates. The social, morphological and behavioral attributes of the hybrid animals may have contributed to their increased RS causing an asymmetric gene flow from the Chinese rhesus genome into the Indian rhesus genome at the CNPRC.