Abstract # 2939 Event # 112:

Scheduled for Saturday, June 19, 2010 09:00 AM-09:10 AM: Session 19 (Mezzanine Ballroom A/B/C/D) Oral Presentation


INVERTEBRATE FORAGING BY COSTA RICAN CAPUCHIN MONKEYS: TESTING PREDICTED SEX DIFFERENCES IN RELATION TO COLOR VISION VARIATION

A. D. Melin1, L. M. Fedigan1 and H. C. Young1,2
1Department of Anthropology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, USA, 2Department of Biological Sciences, University of Calgary
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Invertebrates are an important source of protein for many small-bodied monkeys. Prey vary in size, mobility, protection and whether they are exposed, or embedded in substrates. Both sex and color vision phenotypes have been identified as affecting invertebrate foraging patterns among capuchins. Color vision is sex-linked in this genus: males have dichromatic (red-green deficient) vision and females have dichromatic or trichromatic vision. We tested the hypothesis that sex differences are affected by variation in color vision in white-faced capuchins (Cebus capucinus) and observed four groups in Sector Santa Rosa, Costa Rica for 12 months between January 2007 and September 2008. The color vision genotypes of all individuals were determined by extraction, amplification and sequencing of fecal DNA. Results: Sex: Males spent more time foraging at ground level for invertebrates [ANCOVA: P<0.001]. Females (dichromats and trichromats) spent more time consuming embedded, colonial invertebrates [ANCOVA: P=0.001], ate more “soft” sedentary invertebrates [ANCOVA: P=0.029], and devoted more time to invertebrate foraging [ANCOVA: P=0.034]. Color Vision: Dichromats (males and females) captured more exposed invertebrates [ANCOVA: P=0.006] and spent less time visually foraging [ANCOVA: P=0.018]. Trichromats consumed more “hard” sedentary invertebrates [ANCOVA: P=0.018]. We conclude that some sex differences are actually attributable to color vision, whereas others are not related to visual ecology and reflect other differences between the sexes, such as strength or reproductive demands.