Abstract # 107:

Scheduled for Friday, June 18, 2010 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 18 (Medallion Ballroom C/D/E/F) Poster Presentation


INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES IN SOCIAL EFFECTS OF INFANT PRESENCE ON GROUP-HOUSED RHESUS MONKEY FEMALES

N. Klepper-Kilgore
Mount Ida College, 777 Dedham Street, Newton, Massachusetts 02459, USA
line
     

Breeding harems of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) at the New England Primate Center were observed to assess effects of infant presence on adult interaction. Subjects included 34 adult females and 4 adult males in 4 groups. Infants were reared by their mothers until removal at age 6 months. It was hypothesized that infant presence would promote adult affiliative behaviors. Association indices (AI) for adult pairs in each group were compared under the two conditions; 150 focal sample hours were analyzed. T-tests of individual pairs’ AIs showed no significant differences in affiliation patterns. Thirty-two female-female pairs and 12 female-male pairs had AI differences exceeding within-group standard deviations. In these pairs, increased AI scores were nearly equally divided between periods of infant presence and absence. Chi-square analysis [X2=36.03(4)] suggests that adult female age is a factor: AI scores were increased more commonly in 5-7 year-old females with infants present but in 12-year-old females during infant absence. In two groups AI values were significantly correlated with dominance rank differences between pair members at a level of α=0.05 [r=0.38, n=46; r=0.38, n=45]. These data indicate only modest changes in association patterns within group-housed breeding females as infants are born and removed.