Abstract # 2953 Event # 138:

Scheduled for Saturday, June 19, 2010 02:15 PM-02:25 PM: Session 25 (Mezzanine Ballroom A/B/C/D) Oral Presentation


DOES MONKEY SEE DRIVE MONKEY DO? THE ROLE OF VISUAL ACCESS IN A MATE PREFERENCE TASK

H. M. Graves, D. J. Weiss and S. M. Bay
Pennsylvania State University, 608 Moore Building, University Park, PA 16802, USA
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Previous work indicates that cotton-top tamarins (oedipus saguinus) selectively approach the calls of cagemates over those made by unfamiliar monkeys (Miller et al., 2001). Visual cues may mitigate this effect. Five male and 5 females cotton-top tamarins were allowed to explore a Y-maze in which an opposite sex cagemate and an opposite sex unfamiliar monkey were placed on opposing arms. Time spent in each arm was recorded. In the first condition, an occluder prevented visual access between the arms of the maze, such that the cagemate and unfamiliar monkey could not see each other. In this condition, the focal monkey spent equal time in both arms of the maze [mean of 59s vs. 61s]. However, when full visual access was restored to all monkeys, the focal monkey spent more time approaching its cagemate than the unfamiliar monkey [mean of 70s vs. 50s]. Thus, non-focals’ ability to see the focal monkey results in the focal monkey increasing its time approaching the cagemate. 70% of the tested animals showed this pattern of behavior. These data indicate that the degree to which the non-focal animals have visual access to each other plays a greater role in a monkey's approach behavior than familiarity. Additionally, it suggests that the non-focal monkeys’ ability to see each other reduces the amount of time the focal spends approaching an unfamiliar monkey.