Abstract # 2993 Poster # 162:

Scheduled for Sunday, September 18, 2011 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 23 (Salon G (Sixth Floor)) Poster Presentation


PREVALENCE AND INTENSITY OF INTESTINAL PARASITES OF ALOUATTA PIGRA IN FOREST FRAGMENTS IN PLAYAS DE CATAZAJÁ, CHIAPAS

M. Alvarado Villalobos, J. C. Serio-Silva, A. B. Gatica-Colima and J. García-Hernández
Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Instituto de Ciencias Biomédicas , Juárez, Chihuahua 32690, Mexico
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Few studies have documented the intestinal parasites in the black howler monkey (Alouatta pigra). This is the first study to analyze the prevalence and intensity of intestinal parasites for both sexes and ages of A. pigra in both seasons in Playas of Catazajá, Chiapas, Mexico. Were collected 218 fresh fecal samples from 43 individuals during 2009 and 2010, at six locations in Playas of Catazajá. Using flotation technique with saturated sodium chloride, we found 11 infected individuals, but only three parasites species were detected: Controrchis biliophilus (Dicrocoeliidae), Eimeria spp (Eimeridae), and Trypanoxyuris sp (Oxyuridae), resulting in the percentage of infected individuals being 25.5%. We do not found seasonal effects in the number of individuals infected (dry = 6; rainy = 5) we discuss evidences found in other studies about seasonal effects on parasites prevalence. In our research females were positive for a parasite (30.4%), while only 25% of males tested positive. This may relate to hormone levels during pregnancy and lactation acting as an immunosuppressive. Controrchis biliophilus prevalence in juveniles was 25.0% in dry season and 22.2% in rainy season, while for adults infection was 7.6% in the dry season and 7.1% in rainy season. Although we do not found significant differences between, some studies suggest that juveniles are likely more parasitized than adults because they have not developed an appropriate immunological response against infection.