Abstract # 3023 Poster # 89:

Scheduled for Saturday, September 17, 2011 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 14 (Salon G (Sixth Floor)) Poster Presentation


FRIEND TODAY, FOOD TOMORROW: THE DYNAMIC RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE CHIMPANZEES (PAN TROGLODYTES SCHWEINFURTHII) AND BABOONS (PAPIO CYNOCEPHALUS ANUBIS) OF GOMBE NATIONAL PARK, TANZANIA

M. Shender1, M. Heintz1,2, C. Murray1,2 and E. Lonsdorf1,2
1Lincoln Park Zoo, Lester E. Fisher Center for the Study and Conservation of Apes, Chicago, IL 60614, USA, 2Committee on Evolutionary Biology, University of Chicago
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     Social interactions between young chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) and baboons (Papio cynocephalus anubis) are not well documented. There are many opportunities for interaction since species’ ranges and diets overlap. However, given that adult chimpanzees also hunt baboons, it is intriguing that social interactions take place between young chimpanzees and baboons. Here, we analyzed seven years (1997-2003) of detailed chimpanzee mother-infant behavioral data to characterize interactions between chimpanzee matrilines and baboons. The family groups we studied shared a ranging area with baboons on a regular basis as well as having social interactions with baboons over our study period. Older offspring (ages 5 to 9) were more likely than infants to play with baboons [ANOVA: F1,10 =12.99; p=0.0048; infant n=8, older offspring n=4]. The types of interactions as well as the intensity of the social interaction appear to be related to age. The offspring of higher-ranking mothers were seen to interact with baboons, suggesting their tendency to choose this non-conventional play partner may be due to a level of confidence in their surroundings. Offspring of lower-ranking mothers were not observed to have social interactions with baboons. The differences in frequency of interactions with baboons suggest that maternal rank in the community can affect an offspring’s approach to unusual situations.