Abstract # 197:

Scheduled for Sunday, September 18, 2011 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 23 (Salon G (Sixth Floor)) Poster Presentation


EVALUATING ANXIETY LEVELS AND SEDATION METHODS: INTEGRATING BEHAVIORAL AND VETERINARY PROCEDURES IN LABORATORY RHESUS MACAQUES (MACACA MULATTA)

A. M. West1,2,3, S. P. Flemming1,2,3, M. W. Collins3, N. A. Martinez3, M. A. Granados3, W. L. Wagner3 and J. M. Erwin4,5
1BIOQUAL, Inc., Department of Primate Psychology, Rockville, MD, USA, 2BIOQUAL, Inc., Department of Primate Biology and Medicine, Research Boulevard, Rockville, MD, USA, 3BIOQUAL, Inc. Department of Primate Biology and Medicine, Parklawn Drive, Rockville, MD, USA, 4Department of Anthropology, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA, 5VA-MD Regional College of Veterinary Medicine at Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, USA
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     Evaluating effects on behavior of sedatives commonly used during clinical procedures is essential to ensuring psychological well-being in NHPs. Here, behaviorists and veterinary staff collaborated to evaluate behavioral effects and sedation levels of two commonly used drugs (Ketamine {Dr1}, Ketamine-Midazolam {Dr2}) at an AAALAC- accredited facility. Behavioral observations of 8 rhesus were performed during and after sedation. Individuals were sedated with one drug, and after a two week period, were given the other. Anxiety ratings of NHPs immediately before sedation were evaluated along with physiological parameters at time of sedation, and 20 minutes after. Focal sampling observations at 3 and 5 hours post-sedation (160 minutes per animal) explored differences in anxiety levels, expressions of abnormal behaviors, and activity levels. We found anxiety level before sedation did not affect sedation level of either drug (Spearman’s rho, p> .05). Neither drug showed statistically significant differences in anxiety levels or expression of abnormal behavior post-sedation (Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test; p=.25). Post-sedation activity levels were not significantly different among animals after receiving Dr1 or Dr2 (Wilcoxon p=.75). These results indicate that each drug is an effective sedative, regardless of anxiety-level before sedation, and that neither drug shows lingering behavioral effects. This procedure will be repeated with other commonly used sedatives (Ketamine-Acepromazine; Ketamine- Medetomidine) with our current subjects, and extended to our Macaca fascicularis and Erythrocebus patas colonies.