Abstract # 203:

Scheduled for Monday, September 19, 2011 09:00 AM-09:15 AM: Session 25 (Meeting Room 408) Oral Presentation


SOCIAL BEHAVIOR AND ACTIVITY PATTERNS IN A MIXED-SPECIES GROUP OF CAPTIVE ANGOLAN BLACK-AND-WHITE COLOBUS AND SCHMIDT'S GUENONS AT ZOO ATLANTA

S. Mallavarapu, S. E. Haverly, T. G. Skinner, C. R. Irie and A. Espino
Kennesaw State University, 1000 Chastain road, MB # 2202, Kennesaw, GA 30144, USA
line
     

Very little data exist on the social behavior of Angolan black-and-white colobus (Colobus angolensis palliatus) and Schmidt’s guenons (Cercopithecus ascanius schmidti). We aimed to fill this gap by studying social behavior and activity patterns in a mixed species group of adult C. a. palliatus (n = 3) and C. a. schmidti (n = 2) at Zoo Atlanta. Focal animal scans (with 30 second intervals) and all-occurrences sampling were used to collect data for approximately 75 hours on each species. The colobus spent approximately 81.5% of the scans resting, 9.6% feeding, 5% grooming, 2.5% locomoting, and 1.4% in self-directed behaviors. The guenons spent approximately 68% of the scans resting, 13% feeding, 11% locomoting, 5% grooming, 2% in self-directed behaviors (such as grooming, scratching, picking teeth) and 1% in social behaviors such as present, anogenital inspect, and non-contact aggression. When compared to their wild counterparts, both species spent a greater percentage of time resting, and a lower percentage of time locomoting and feeding. Incorporating feeding enrichment devices into the exhibit might elicit more species-typical activity patterns. The low frequencies of inter-specific aggression, and agitated scratching and locomotion (which can indicate anxiety and stress), imply that the two species are able to co-habit peacefully in the same exhibit.