Abstract # 3087 Event # 41:

Scheduled for Saturday, September 17, 2011 03:20 PM-03:40 PM: Session 9 (Meeting Room 410) Oral Presentation


NEURAL AND BEHAVIORAL CORRELATES OF AUDITORY MEMORY FOR SIMPLE, COMPLEX, AND COMMUNICATION SOUNDS IN RHESUS MACAQUES AND HUMANS

A. Poremba
University of Iowa, E11 SSH, Dept. of Psychology, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA
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     Understanding auditory memory processing in general is at an early stage. Critical knowledge of the neural components may help to delineate how this type of memory interacts with important functions such as communication. There are several indicators suggesting that auditory memory capabilities are quite different from well-established norms for visual memory. Present findings suggest there are indeed differences; however, there are also many similarities between auditory and visual memory on behavioral and neural levels. Herein, this was explored by using tests of recognition memory utilizing an auditory delayed matching-to-sample (DMTS) paradigm in male and female rhesus macaques (macaca mulatta) with single-unit and local field potential recordings from regions processing auditory information in primary and association areas. Additionally, auditory memory in monkeys and humans is examined with the same DMTS paradigm and demonstrates that, for non-communication signals, memory performance is similar between species, whereas familiarity and communication signals extend the boundaries of auditory memory. In summary, the results suggest that while many of the same mechanisms are expressed, i.e., enhancement or suppression for matching auditory stimuli, memory delay activity is not robust in comparison to when visual stimuli are used, which perhaps underlies the large difference in memory capabilities between modalities. This work was supported by funding awarded to Amy Poremba: NIH, NIDCD, DC0007156.