Abstract # 95:

Scheduled for Saturday, September 17, 2011 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 14 (Salon G (Sixth Floor)) Poster Presentation


COFORAGING IN WILD GOLDEN LION TAMARINS (LEONTOPITHECUS ROSALIA) IN THE UNIAO RESERVE, RJ, BRAZIL

A. Slack and L. G. Rapaport
Clemson University, 132 Long Hall, Dept. of Biological Sciences, Clemson, SC 29632, USA
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Callitrichidae primates are cooperative breeders; all adult group members exhibit extended parental care by provisioning young and providing foraging assistance. Juveniles often follow adults and forage with them. We conducted a longitudinal study of wild golden lion tamarins 11-56 weeks of age, in six groups, to examine the ontogeny of coforaging behaviors. A linear mixed-model analysis of variance incorporating repeated measures was performed on rates of five foraging behaviors. For plant coforaging, we found that rates at which juveniles approached foraging adults tended to decline with age (F=3.34, p=.0531), and the rates at which they begged (F=4.71, p=.0193), and coforaged (F=3.44, p=.0495) also decreased significantly. For prey foraging, rates at which adults vacated a site within 5sec of a juvenile’s approach (F=7.11, p=.0039), at which juveniles begged (F=5.41, p=.0119), and coforaged (F=5.09, p=.0148) declined significantly with age. Type of vegetative substrate on which individuals coforaged and proportion of food gained through independent or assisted means also were compared between juveniles and adults. By the time juveniles were in the oldest age category (about one year of age) substrate choice when coforaging for prey and means of food acquisition still significantly differed from those of adults. Juveniles coforaged most often at 25-40wk of age, but the oldest juveniles continued coforaging at high rates, perhaps as a means to acquire foraging information from older group members.