Abstract # 3100 Poster # 82:

Scheduled for Saturday, September 17, 2011 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 14 (Salon G (Sixth Floor)) Poster Presentation


MONTHLY, SEASONAL AND ANNUAL DIETARY VARIATION IN CERCOPITHECUS DIANA IN THE IVORY COAST'S TAI NATIONAL PARK

E. E. Kane1, E. A. Bitty2 and W. S. McGraw1
1The Ohio State University, Department of Anthropology, 174 W. 18th Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA, 2University of Cocody (Ivory Coast)
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The guenons are one of the most taxonomically diverse and widespread primate radiations; however, the extent to which the behavioral ecology of many Cercopithecus spp. varies is poorly known since long term feeding data on most species are derived from only a handful of sites. The lack of comparative and longitudinal data for endangered guenons, including the West African Diana monkey Cercopithecus diana, inhibits our ability to assess habitat requirements, identify keystone resources and make informed conservation decisions. Here, we present five years of feeding data on four Diana monkey groups ranging within the Ivory Coast’s Tai Forest. Food scans taken every 30 minutes on habituated individuals were used to generate temporal and group-specific feeding profiles. Monthly, seasonal and annual dietary inventories for each group are interpreted using five years of phenological data on all food trees. Group specific diet data are compared with those collected previously at Tai (Buzzard 2006) and Tiwai Island, Sierra Leone (Oates and Whitesides 1990). The results indicate that fruit accounts for 71-80% of the annual diet, insects 17-21%, and leaves 3-4%, with inter-annual and inter-group variation. Annually, females eat more fruit (72%) and leaves (4%), and fewer insects (23%) than males (65% fruit, 1% leaves, 34% insects). These results indicate much greater flexibility in Diana monkey food choice than those of previous studies, a result with significant conservation implications.