Abstract # 3116 Poster # 107:

Scheduled for Saturday, September 17, 2011 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 14 (Salon G (Sixth Floor)) Poster Presentation


PHYLOGENETIC ANALYSIS OF SEXUALLY DIMORPHIC SOCIAL REWARD SYSTEMS AND SOCIAL BONDS IN ANTHROPOID PRIMATES

L. J. Leedom
Department of Psychology, University of Bridgeport, 126 Park Avenue, Bridgeport, CT 06611, USA
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Although primate affiliative behavior and social bonds are often discussed as “attachment,” there are four social reward systems that are subject to neuroplasticity/learning: attachment, caregiving, dominance and sexual systems. I hypothesize four differentiable classes of social bonds referent to these sexually dimorphic brain social reward systems. Since social reward systems act synergistically or antagonistically, specific patterns of social bonds and social reward will be observed as is adaptive for species. A literature review of field studies regarding the four systems for 238 anthropoid primate species was conducted. Behavior and bonds were quantified. Phylogenic relationships were obtained from 10kTrees (Evolutionary Anthropology 19:114-118). Analysis of the sexually dimorphic nature of the four social behavioral systems was conducted. The following patterns resulted: 1. A solitary phase of life for either sex may be an index of the attachment system. 2. In species with female allocare, males are less frequently solitary. 3. Sexual bonds (which are dimensional and need not imply exclusivity) are more common for males than females and may serve to facilitate a male’s transition from a multimale group to a heterosexual group. 4. Female sexual bonding correlates with intolerance of other females. The adoption by primatologists of a convention with respect to the naming of social bonds may be indicated because the data demonstrate that not all bonds result from “attachment.” The human pattern of social bonds is quite unique.