Abstract # 155:

Scheduled for Sunday, September 18, 2011 05:00 PM-05:15 PM: Session 22 (Meeting Room 410) Oral Presentation


SIGNIFICANT GENOTYPE BY DIET (GXD) INTERACTION EFFECTS ON CARDIOMETABOLIC RESPONSES TO A PEDIGREE-WIDE, DIETARY CHALLENGE IN VERVET MONKEYS (CHLOROCEBUS AETHIOPS SABAEUS)

V. Voruganti1, M. J. Jorgensen2,3, J. R. Kaplan2,3, K. Kavanagh2,3, L. L. Rudel2,3, R. Temel2,3, L. A. Fairbanks4 and A. G. Comuzzie1,5
1Texas Biomedical Research Institute, PO Box 760549, San Antonio, Texas 78245, USA, 2Department of Pathology and Wake Forest University Primate Center,Winston-Salem, NC 27157, 3Wake Forest University Translational Science Institute, Winston-Salem, NC 27157, 4Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior and UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles CA 90095, 5Southwest National Primate Research Center, Texas Biomedical Research Institute, San Antonio, Texas 78245
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In this study we examined how genotype and diet interact (G x D) to affect cardiometabolic risk factors. Vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops sabaeus ) (3-24 years of age, n = 309), consuming a plant-based diet (18% of calories from protein, 13% from fat, and 69% from carbohydrates), were fed for eight weeks with a diet designed to model the typical American diet (18% of calories from protein, 35% from fat, and 47% carbohydrates). Exposure to the challenge diet did not result in significant changes in weight, however, most lipid and glycemic biomarkers moved in an adverse direction (p < 0.01). Quantitative genetic analyses showed that cardiometabolic phenotypes were significantly heritable under both dietary conditions (p < 0.05), however, there was significant evidence of G x D interaction for these traits. We observed significant differences in the additive genetic variances for lipid traits (p < 10-4), indicating that a common set of genes influence them under the two diets but that the magnitude of the effect is different. In addition, we rejected the hypothesis that the same genetic factors influence glucose and weight-related traits (p < 0.01), signifying that these phenotypes are influenced by different genes under the two different diets. In summary, there is evidence of a significant interaction between genes and diet in the regulation of key metabolic parameters.