Abstract # 103:

Scheduled for Saturday, September 17, 2011 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: Session 14 (Salon G (Sixth Floor)) Poster Presentation


AN ASSESSMENT OF BLACK-HANDED SPIDER MONKEY (ATELES GEOFFROYI) MOBILITY USING GPS DATA, BARRO COLORADO ISLAND, PANAMA

P. Barahona1, C. Campbell1 and S. Ramirez2
1Department of Anthropology, California State University Northridge, Northridge, CA 91330, USA, 2University of Texas, San Antonio
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   This study examines GPS data and their effectiveness for gathering ranging data of free-ranging spider monkeys on Barro Colorado Island (BCI), Panama. A GPS collar was placed on a female subadult black-handed spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi) and data were downloaded remotely from January to May, 2010 (the dry season and beginning of rainy season on BCI). Points were attempted every 15 minutes from 6am to 6pm and from 10:45pm to 11:45pm (for a total of 52 attempts per day). Of the GPS data collection attempts, 82% were successful (the 18% unsuccessful attempts occurring as a result of the GPS tag timing out after 90 seconds). ArcMap was then used to map the points and convert them to KMZ files (compressed KML – Keyhole Markup Language). The animal moved an average of 2431 meters per day (range 821-3985m). Sleeping sites were determined by the points taken late at night (10:45 to 11:45pm), mapped and matched according to date. Most of the “sleeping sites” were found to be used repeatedly for up to 4 days. These data proved useful for determining average distance moved per day, short and long term patterns, and finding previously unknown sleeping sites.